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CALENDAR NOTES

2021-2022
Legislature
August 1, Monday, Legislature reconvenes from Summer Recess
August 12, Friday: Last day for fiscal committees to meet and report bills
August 15, Monday – August 31, Wednesday: Floor session only. No committee may meet for any purpose except Rules Committee, bills referred pursuant to Assembly Rules 77.2, and Conference Committees

August 25, Thursday: Last day to amend bills on the floor
August 31, Thursday: Last day for each house to pass bill; Final Recess begin upon adjournment
BILL TRACKING TABLE UPDATED 7/17/2022 California Bill Tracking Tables, All Years 2006-2021
BILL NOAUTHOR(S)SUBJECTSTATUSTAC’S ACTIONS
SENATE Standing Rules of the Senate for the 2021–22 Regular Session
SB 513
Introduced 2/17/21
Robert M. Hertzberg
(D-18) Van Nuys
As gutted and amended, January 3, 2021, SB 513 amends in SB 344 to require the California Emergency Solutions and Housing Program subject to an appropriation in the annual Budget Act, to develop and administer a program to award grants to qualified homeless shelters, as described, for the provision of shelter, food, and basic veterinary services for pets owned by people experiencing homelessness. The bill would authorize the department to use up to 5% of the funds appropriated in the annual Budget Act for those purposes for its costs in administering the program.
Senate Committee on Housing Policy Analysis, January 2022.
SEN Com on Housing, pass
SEN Approps, SUSPENSE; pass, SEN FLR pass; Assembly, Held at Desk
Fiscal Committee
SB 879
Introduced
1/26/2022
Scott Wiener
(D-11)S
San Francisco,
Northern San Mateo
County


Sponsored by HSUS
As introduced, SB 879 would add to the Civil Code a new Section 1834.9.3 that would be cited as, “Protection of Dogs and Cats from Unnecessary Testing Act,” and read:
1834.9.3.
(a) For purposes of this section, the following definitions shall apply:
(1) “Alternative test method” means a test method that does not use animals, or in some cases reduces or refines the use of animals, for which the reliability and relevance for a specific purpose has been established by validation bodies, including, but not limited to, the Interagency Coordinating Committee for the Validation of Alternative Methods and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. Alternative test methods include, but are not limited to, high-throughput screening methods, testing of categories of chemical substances, tiered testing methods, in vitro studies, and systems biology.
(2) “Cat” means any member of the species Felis catus.
(3) “Canine or feline toxicological experiment” means any test or study of any duration that seeks to determine the effect, if any, of the application or exposure, whether internal or external, of any amount of a chemical substance on a dog or cat. “Application or exposure” includes, but is not limited to, oral ingestion, skin or eye contact, or inhalation. “Application or exposure” does not include testing of veterinary products for canine or feline health.
(4) “Chemical substance” shall have the same meaning as that term is defined under Section 2602 of Title 15 of the United States Code, except that for purposes of this section, such term shall include any pesticide, as defined under Section 136(u) of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (7 U.S.C. Sec. 136 et seq.) and any food additive, as defined under Section 321(s) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. Sec. 301 et seq.).
(5) “Pesticide” shall have the same meaning as that term is defined in Section 136(u) of Title 7 of the United States Code.
(6) “Food additive” shall have the same meaning as that term is defined in Section 321(s) of Title 21 of the United States Code.
(7) “Dog” means any member of the species Canis familiaris.
(8) “Testing facility” means any partnership, corporation, association, school, institution, organization, or other legal relationship, whether privately or government owned, leased, or operated, that tests chemicals, ingredients, product formulations, or products in this state.
(b) Notwithstanding any other law, and in addition to the prohibitions set forth in Sections 1834.9 and 1834.9.5, a testing facility shall not conduct a canine or feline toxicological experiment in this state to do either of the following:
(1) Achieve discovery, approval, registration, or maintenance of a pesticide or chemical substance, unless such experiment is conducted pursuant to an express requirement imposed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) per the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (7 U.S.C. Sec. 136 et seq.); the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 U.S.C. Sec. 2601 et seq.); or any binding agency regulation promulgated upon notice and comment thereunder.
(2) Achieve discovery or approval of a food additive, unless such experiment is conducted pursuant to an express requirement imposed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) per the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. Sec. 301 et seq.) or any binding agency regulation promulgated upon notice and comment thereunder.
(c) (1) Notwithstanding any other law, the Attorney General, the district attorney of the county in which the violation is alleged to have occurred, or a city attorney of a city or city and county having a population in excess of 750,000 and in which the violation is alleged to have occurred, may bring a civil action for injunctive relief pursuant to this paragraph. If the court determines that the Attorney General, district attorney, or city attorney is the prevailing party in the enforcement action, the official may also recover costs, attorney fees, and a civil penalty not to exceed five thousand dollars ($5,000) for each day that each dog or each cat is used in a canine or feline toxicological experiment in violation of this section.
(2) The procedure set forth in paragraph (1) is the exclusive remedy for enforcing this section.
(d) The prohibition in subdivision (b) shall not apply to testing or experimentation conducted for the purpose of developing, manufacturing, or marketing any product intended for beneficial use in dogs or cats, including, but not limited to, anesthesia, cancer treatment, animal vaccines, other animal medicines, or flea and tick products.
SEC. 3.
The provisions of this act are severable. If any provision of this act or its application is held invalid, that invalidity shall not affect other provisions or applications that can be given effect without the invalid provision or application.
Amended in Senate, March 21, 2022 to clarify language.
Senate Com on Judiciary Policy Analysis, March 25, 2022

See prior bills, 2021 SB (Wiener) held under submission, 8/26/2021 See 2020 AB 2059 (Kamerlager) would have created the Protection of Dogs from Unnecessary Testing Act by adding to the Civil Code a new §1834.9.3 was held under submission in Suspense File of Assembly Appropriations.


SEN COM on Judiciary
HRG 3/29
pass 11/0

SEN Approps
Hrg 4/18/25/22








Fiscal Committee
Joint Rule 55 suspended. (Ayes 31. Noes 6. Page 2880.)
Art. IV. Sec. 8(a) of the Constitution dispensed with.
SB 971
Introduced
8/10/2022
Josh Newman
(D-29) Fullerton
As introduced, SB 971 would amend existing Revenue and Taxation Code sections to allow a state low-income housing tax credit for “housing sponsors” to be authorized by the California Tax Credit Allocation Committee in accordance with IRS provisions and using a scoring system of points to encourage compassionate and efficient use of public subsidy, beginning with allocation for the 2022 calendar year, by including, “but not be limited to, a project’s policy that allows the resident of the housing development to keep one or more common household pets, as defined in Section 50466 of the Health and Safety Code, in the resident’s dwelling unit; does not impose a monthly fee associated with the keeping of one or more common household pets in a unit; imposes reasonable limitations on the number of animals in a unit based on the unit’s size and prohibitions on potentially dangerous or vicious dogs as determined pursuant to Chapter 9 (commencing with Section 31601) of Division 14 of the Food and Agricultural Code, and for this provision, a reasonable condition does not include a prohibition on a breed of common household pets, as defined in Section 50466 of the Health and Safety Code, or a limitation on the weight of the common household pet; The scoring system shall provide additional point value to a project that does not impose a monthly fee associated with the keeping of one or more common household pets in a unit; and does not limit or otherwise affect applicable state laws and local government ordinances related to public health, animal control, and animal anticruelty, or other statutes or laws that require reasonable accommodations to be made for an individual with a disability who maintains an animal to provide assistance, service, or support. To support use of tax law for this inclusion of animal issues, a list of legislative findings comprise Section 1 of the bill linking allegations about pets with the goals of the existing law that would further enhanced public policy for pet welfare and public benefit of supporting pet friendly, reasonably priced housing:
 The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) Each year tens of thousands of pets enter California animal shelters, and one of the most frequently cited reasons for relinquishment is a housing, moving, or landlord issue. Often, rehoming is the last option for a family, which has detrimental impacts on the physical and emotional wellbeing of the pet and the family.
(b) A majority of Americans consider their pets to be family members and nearly three-fourths of renters have pets, but many people have trouble finding housing because often properties advertised as “pet-friendly” include high fees and restrictions such as breed, weight, and number limits that create barriers for pet-owning tenants.
(c) Extensive restrictions on pet keeping disproportionately impact low-income households, limiting how they can define their families. Those restrictions force some families to choose between relinquishing a beloved pet and moving into or staying in a home. Due to those restrictions, there is a severe need for properties that welcome cats and dogs as pets at a reasonable cost.
(d) It is the intent of the Legislature in enacting this legislation to encourage housing developers, owners, and operators to increase pet-inclusive affordable housing in California.
(e) Housing developers typically use funds from multiple sources, and the state low-income housing tax credit (LIHTC) is the single largest source of funding for affordable housing.
(f) Therefore, amending the system for scoring LIHTC applications to be pet inclusive will benefit California taxpayers in their responsibility to support California’s homeless animals in shelters, California’s pet-owning tenants living in subsidized housing, and California’s companion animals.

As amended in Senate, March 10, 2022, to delete from the findings sections (e) and (f) and gut and amend the substantive provisions of the bill so amend Health & Safely Code Section 50466: SECTION 1.
 The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) Each year tens of thousands of pets enter California animal shelters, and one of the most frequently cited reasons for relinquishment is a housing, moving, or landlord issue. Often, rehoming is the last option for a family, which has detrimental impacts on the physical and emotional wellbeing of the pet and the family.
(b) A majority of Americans consider their pets to be family members and nearly three-fourths of renters have pets, but many people have trouble finding housing because often properties advertised as “pet-friendly” include high fees and restrictions such as breed, weight, and number limits that create barriers for pet-owning tenants.
(c) Extensive restrictions on pet keeping disproportionately impact low-income households, limiting how they can define their families. Those restrictions force some families to choose between relinquishing a beloved pet and moving into or staying in a home. Due to those restrictions, there is a severe need for properties that welcome cats and dogs as pets at a reasonable cost.
(d) It is the intent of the Legislature in enacting this legislation to encourage housing developers, owners, and operators to increase pet-inclusive affordable housing in California.

SEC. 2. Section 50466 of the Health and Safety Code is amended to read:
50466.
 (a) (1)
 The department shall require each housing development that is financed on or after January 1, 2018, pursuant to this division, to authorize a resident of the housing development to own or otherwise maintain one or more common household pets within the resident’s dwelling unit, subject to applicable state laws and local government ordinances related to public health, animal control, and animal anticruelty.
(2) (A) (i) Notwithstanding paragraph (1), the department shall require each housing development that is financed on or after January 1, 2023, pursuant to this division or by any moneys administered or otherwise provided by the department to authorize a resident of the housing development to own or otherwise maintain one or more common household pets within the resident’s dwelling unit, subject to applicable state laws and local government ordinances related to public health, animal control, and animal anticruelty, and subject to other reasonable conditions.
(ii) Notwithstanding paragraph (1), any housing development that is the basis for the receipt, on or after January 1, 2023, of any low-income housing tax credit under Section 12206, 17058, or 23610.5 of the Revenue and Taxation Code shall authorize a resident of the housing development to own or otherwise maintain one or more common household pets within the resident’s dwelling unit, subject to applicable state laws and local government ordinances related to public health, animal control, and animal anticruelty, and subject to other reasonable conditions.
(B) This paragraph shall not be construed to interfere with the ability to charge a refundable deposit pursuant to Section 1950.5 of the Civil Code. However, a monthly fee for the ownership or maintenance of common household pets, as authorized by this paragraph, in the housing development shall not be imposed.
(C) For purposes of this paragraph, “reasonable conditions” include, but are not limited to, limitations on the number of animals in a unit based on the unit’s size and prohibitions on potentially dangerous or vicious dogs, as determined pursuant to Chapter 9 (commencing with Section 31601) of Division 14 of the Food and Agricultural Code. A “reasonable condition” does not include a prohibition on a breed of common household pets or a limitation on the weight of the common household pet.
(b) For purposes of this section, “common household pet” means a domesticated animal, such as a dog or cat, that is commonly kept in the home for pleasure rather than for commercial purposes.
(c) This section shall not limit or otherwise affect eligibility for, or be included as a matter during the compliance period of, any credit under Section 12206, 17058, or 23610.5 of the Revenue and Taxation Code.
(c) Nothing in this 
  This  section shall not  be construed to limit or otherwise affect applicable state laws and local government ordinances related to public health, animal control, and animal anticruelty, or  other statutes or laws that require reasonable accommodations to be made for an individual with a disability who maintains an animal to provide assistance, service, or support.
Senate Committee on Housing Policy Analysis, March 21, 2022
SEN Com on Housing
HRG March 24
pass 6-0(3)

SEN Approps
Hrg 4/18/22


Fiscal Committee
2/3 Vote Required

Article IV Section 8(a) of the Constitution and Joint Rule 55 dispensed with February 7, 2022, suspending the 30 calendar day requirement.
SB 1009
Introduced
2/14/2022
Andreas Borgeas
(R-8) Fresno
As introduced, SB 1009 would make technical, nonsubstantive changes to Family Code Section 2605 regarding authorizing the court, in dissolution or legal separation cases involving final determination of ownership of a pet animal to take into consideration the care of the pet animal.SPOT BILL
SEN Rules
Non-Fiscal Com
30 calendar day rule suspended.
AB 1417
Introduced
2/18/2022
Andreas Borgeas
(R-8) Fresno
As introduced, SB 1417 would make a nonsubstantive change to Food & Agricultural Code 30801 regarding issuance of dog licenses. SEN Rules
SPOT BILL
30 calendar day rule suspended.
SB 1462
introduced
2/18/2022
Steven Bradford
(D-35) Gardena
As introduced, SB 1462 would add to the Health and Safety Code, Chapter 10 of Part 6 of Division 104 a new Article  5.5. Labeling providing a process for a person who in California manufactures a processed pet food may apply to the department for designation, including a renewal of a designation, of a processed pet food as human food grade.
Sen Com on Health
HRG 4/6 set for first hearing canceled at the request of author. 4/20

Fiscal Committee
30 calendar day rule suspended.
ASSEMBLY Standing Rules of the Assembly for the 2021–22 Regular Session    Per usage and custom, the previous session Joint Rules apply until
Joint Rules are passed for the current session Joint Rules of Senate and Assembly  
AB 1648
Introduced
1/13/2022
Brian Maienschein (D-77) San DiegoAs introduced, AB 1648 would add to the Government Code a new §8608.1 reading, ” A city or county that requires a kennel license or permit to operate a kennel within its jurisdiction shall require, as a condition for obtaining the license or permit, that the kennel owner create and submit to the city or county an animal natural disaster evacuation plan for any kennel covered by the license or permit.”
As amended in Assembly, March 23, 2022 to add content to bill Section 1:
(b) An animal natural disaster evacuation plan shall include, at a minimum, all of the following:
(1) Primary kennel emergency contact person’s contact information.
(2) Secondary kennel emergency contact person’s contact information.
(3) Kennel facility floor plan.
(4) Location on the premises where transport resources are stored.
(5) (A) Address of primary evacuation site.
(B) Contact information for the contact person at the primary evacuation site.
(6) (A) Address of secondary evacuation site, if applicable.
(B) Contact information for the contact person at the secondary evacuation site, if applicable.
(7) Protocol for accessing current census and records of animals on site.
(8) Protocol for animal transport.
(9) Protocol for reunification of owned animals or offsite sheltering of unowned animals, as applicable.
(c) For purposes of this section, “contact information” includes name, telephone number, email address, and alternate telephone number.
Assembly Com on Emergency Management, policy analysis, March 30, 2022

Prior bills: 2019 AB 486, Monique Limón (D-37) Goleta, held in ASM Suspense, see ASM Approps Analysis for fiscal issues. 2020 AB 2568, Maienschein, no action.
ASM COM on Emergency Management
Hrg 4/4
pass 7-0

to Approps

Fiscal Committee
AB 1781
Introduced
2/3/2022
Blanca Rubio
(D- 48) Baldwin Park
As introduced, AB 1781 would add to Part 6 of Division 105 of the Health and Safety Code a new CHAPTER  12. Safe Transportation of Dogs and Cats
122390, to read:
122390.1.
 For purposes of this chapter, “mobile or traveling housing facility” means a transporting vehicle, including, but not limited to, a car, truck, trailer, bus, or recreational vehicle used to transport animals by an entity described in Section 122390.3.
122390.2.
 The conditions in a mobile or traveling housing facility for dogs and cats shall not endanger the health or well-being of an animal due to heat, cold, lack of adequate ventilation, lack of food or water, or other circumstances that could reasonably be expected to cause suffering, disability, or death to the animal.
122390.3.
 This chapter applies to any public animal control agency or shelter, society for the prevention of cruelty to animals shelter, humane society shelter, or rescue group that is in a cooperative agreement with at least one private or public shelter pursuant to Section 31108, 31752, or 31753 of the Food and Agricultural Code.
Amended in Assembly, April 5, 2022 to amend subsection (e) of the findings as follows:
(e)Ensuring animal control vehicles have climate control capabilities will prevent unnecessary suffering or even death of animals during transportation from the field to care facilities.
(e) Ensuring animals that are being transported are protected from the elements and adverse weather will prevent unnecessary suffering.



Prior legislation: 2018 AB 2362 (Rubio) Vetoed by Governor Brown citing provisions too vague.
As drafted this bill addresses lack of standards for vehicles, equipment and procedures of California shelter and rescue long distance transport of animals.
ASM COM on
Business & Professions

HRG 4/26

Non-Fiscal Com
AB 1881
Introduced
2/8/2022
Miguel Santiago
(D- 58) Los Angeles
As introduced, AB 1881 would to the Food and Agricultural Code, a new Division 14.6, beginning at Section 31800, the Dog and Cat Bill of Rights. Section 1 of the bill contains legislative findings reading as follows:
The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) Dogs and cats have the right to be respected as sentient beings that experience complex feelings that are common among living animals while being unique to each individual animal.
(b) With the availability of free registries, microchipping with updated contact information is a key component to reuniting dogs and cats with their guardians and keeping them out of shelters.
(c) Local animal control agencies in California are forced to spend multimillions of taxpayer dollars every year to collect, control, and euthanize the state’s unwanted overpopulation of dogs and cats.
(d) Sterilizing dogs and cats is a key component to reducing the state’s overpopulation of dogs and cats.
(e) The Pet Lover’s License Plate was established to provide dog and cat owners or guardians in California access to free or low-cost spay and neuter services in an effort to reduce the state’s dog and cat overpopulation.
(f) Lifelong care of a companion animal should be a commitment to that animal for the entirety of its life.
(g) Ownership or guardianship of a companion animal requires an investment of time and resources. Selecting a companion animal that is suited to one’s home and lifestyle will lead to a more rewarding relationship between guardian and animal, while reducing relinquished or abandoned animals in our communities.
(h) Dogs and cats thrive with regular enrichment to maintain their physical and emotional well-being.
(i) While requirements for basic physical care, such as the provision of food, water, and shelter, are set forth in most jurisdictions, as one of the largest and most progressive states in the country, California can and should strive to recognize the importance of animals’ mental well-being.
(j) Prioritizing the mental and emotional well-being of dogs and cats can increase the animal-human bond, increase companion animal retention, reduce neglect and cruelty, and can contribute towards a more humane and compassionate society.
Section 2 of the bill contains the text to be added to the Food and Agricultural Code:
§31800. This division shall be known, and may be cited, as the Dog and Cat Bill of Rights.
31801.
(a) Dogs and cats have the right to be free from exploitation, cruelty, neglect, and abuse.
(b) Dogs and cats have the right to a life of comfort, free of fear and anxiety.
(c) Dogs and cats have the right to daily mental stimulation and appropriate exercise.
(d) Dogs and cats have the right to nutritious food, sanitary water, and shelter in an appropriate and safe environment.
(e) Dogs and cats have the right to preventive and therapeutic health care.
(f) Dogs and cats have the right to be properly identified through tags, microchips, or other humane means.
(g) Dogs and cats have the right to be spayed and neutered to prevent unwanted litters.
31802.
(a) Each public animal control agency or shelter, society for the prevention of cruelty to animals shelter, humane society shelter, or rescue group shall post a copy of the Dog and Cat Bill of Rights in a conspicuous place accessible to public view.
(b) A fine shall not be assessed for a first time offense for failure to comply with this section. Each additional violation of this section occurring after 60 days from the first offense is punishable by a fine not exceeding two hundred fifty dollars ($250).
31803.
This division does not create or imply a private right of action for a violation of this division. It is the intent of the Legislature that the Dog and Cat Bill of Rights set forth in Section 31801 inform potential owners of the standards for basic physical care and emotional well-being of dogs and cats.
Section 3 of the bill reads: If the Commission on State Mandates determines that this act contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement to local agencies and school districts for those costs shall be made pursuant to Part 7 (commencing with Section 17500) of Division 4 of Title 2 of the Government Code.
Amended in Assembly, April 18, 2022
Assembly Com on Business and Professions Policy Analysis, April 23, 2022
Amended in Assembly, April 27, 2022 SECTION 1. This act shall be known, and may be cited, as the Dog and Cat Bill of Rights.
SEC. 2.
 The Legislature finds and declares all of the following:
(a) Dogs and cats have the right to be respected as sentient beings that experience complex feelings that are common among living animals while being unique to each individual animal.
(b) With the availability of free registries, microchipping with updated contact information is a key component to reuniting dogs and cats with their owners and keeping them out of shelters.
(c) Local animal welfare agencies in California are forced to spend millions of taxpayer dollars every year to collect, control, care for, and euthanize the state’s unwanted overpopulation of dogs and cats.
(d) Sterilizing dogs and cats is a key component to reducing the state’s overpopulation of dogs and cats.
(e) The Pet Lover’s License Plate was established to provide dog and cat owners in California access to free or low-cost spay and neuter services in an effort to reduce the state’s dog and cat overpopulation.
(f) Lifelong care of a dog or cat should be a commitment to that animal for the entirety of its life.
(g) Ownership of a dog or cat requires an investment of time and resources. Selecting a dog or cat that is suited to one’s home and lifestyle will lead to a more rewarding relationship between owner and animal, while reducing relinquished or abandoned animals in our communities.
(h) Dogs and cats thrive with regular enrichment that is appropriate for their age and health to maintain their physical and emotional well-being.
(i) While requirements for basic physical care, such as the provision of food, water, and shelter, are set forth in most jurisdictions, as one of the largest and most progressive states in the country, California can and should strive to recognize the importance of animals’ mental and emotional well-being.
(j) Prioritizing the mental and emotional well-being of dogs and cats can increase the animal-human bond, increase dog and cat retention, reduce neglect and cruelty, and can contribute towards a more humane and compassionate society.
SEC. 3. Division 14.6 (commencing with Section 31800) is added to the Food and Agricultural Code, to read:
DIVISION 14.6. Welfare of Dogs and Cats

31800.
 (a) Each public animal control agency or shelter, society for the prevention of cruelty to animals shelter, humane society shelter, or rescue group shall provide a copy of the notice specified in subdivision (c) to new owners, or shall post a copy of the notice in a conspicuous place accessible to public view.
(b) A fine shall not be assessed for a first time offense for failure to comply with this section. Each additional violation of this section occurring after 60 days from the first offense is punishable by a fine not exceeding two hundred fifty dollars ($250).
(c) The notice required by subdivision (a) shall read as follows:
“Dogs and cats deserve to be free from exploitation, cruelty, neglect, and abuse.
Dogs and cats deserve a life of comfort, free of fear and anxiety.
Dogs and cats deserve daily mental stimulation and appropriate exercise considering the age and energy level of the dog or cat.
Dogs and cats deserve nutritious food, sanitary water, and shelter in an appropriate and safe environment.
Dogs and cats deserve regular and appropriate veterinary care.
Dogs and cats deserve to be properly identified through tags, microchips, or other humane means.
Dogs and cats deserve to be spayed and neutered to prevent unwanted litters.”
31802.
 (a) This division does not create or imply a private right of action for a violation of this division. It is the intent of the Legislature that the notice set forth in Section 31800 is solely to inform potential owners of the standards for basic physical care and emotional well-being of dogs and cats.
(b) This division does not create a crime or a penalty other than the penalty provided in Section 31802 regarding posting requirements for educational purposes.
SEC. 4.
 If the Commission on State Mandates determines that this act contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement to local agencies and school districts for those costs shall be made pursuant to Part 7 (commencing with Section 17500) of Division 4 of Title 2 of the Government Code.
Assembly Com on Appropriations Fiscal Analysis, May 9, 2022
Assembly Floor Analysis, May 13, 2022
Amended in Senate, June 14, 2022 amends enforcement provision 31800. (d)
Amended in Senate, June 30, 2022
See an earlier version of AB 1881 that had appeared as a gut and amend to 2021 AB 702 on 1/3/22, failed under calendar deadlines. See 2021 Tracking Table, AB 702
ASM COM on Business & Professions,
HRG 4/26
pass 14-0(4)

ASM Approps
pass 12-3(1)

ASSEMBLY Floor
pass 53-13(12)

SENATE Dual referred:
SEN Com on Coms. on B., P. & E.D. Hrg 6/20
passed

SEN Com on JUDICIARY Hrg 6/29 passed

SEN Approps HRG 8/1






Fiscal Committee
State-Mandated Local Program
AB 1885
Introduced
2/8/2022
Ash Kalra
(D-27) San Jose
As introduced, AB 1885 would amend statutory provisions enacted by 2018 AB 2215 (Kalra) amending the Veterinary Practice Act provisions regarding cannabis.
Assembly Com on Business & Professions Policy Analysis, April 16, 2022
ASM Com on Business & Professions
HRG 4/19
Fiscal Committee
AB 1901
Introduced
2/9/2022
Adrin Nazarian
(D-46) Toluca Lake, Los Angeles
As introduced, AB 1901 was a spot bill amending the Government Code regarding state boundaries; as gutted and amended March 24, 2022 it would add to the Health & Safety Code, Part 6 of Division 105 a new Chapter 12.5 (commencing with Section 122395)
SECTION 1.
 Chapter 12.5 (commencing with Section 122395) is added to Part 6 of Division 105 of the Health and Safety Code, to read:
CHAPTER  12.5. Dog Training
122395. This chapter shall be known, and may be cited, as the Dog Trainer Sufficiency Act.
122395.1. The following definitions apply for purposes of this chapter:
(a) “Dog trainer” or “trainer” means a person, firm, partnership, corporation, or other association that sells, offers, or provides dog training services on the premises of the person, firm, partnership, corporation, or other association.
(b) “Dog training facility” means any lot, building, structure, enclosure, or premises, or a portion thereof, whereupon dogs are trained at the request of, and in exchange for compensation provided by, their owner. A dog training facility may be on the same premises as a dog boarding facility, as defined in Section 122380.
(c) “Dog training facility operator” or “operator” means a person who owns or operates, or both, a dog training facility.
(d) “Enrichment” means providing objects or activities, appropriate to the needs, as well as the age, size, and condition of the dog, that stimulate the dog and promote the dog’s well-being.
(e) “Permanent or fixed enclosure” means a structure, including, but not limited to, an exercise run, kennel, or room, used to restrict a dog, that provides for the effective separation of a dog from the dog’s waste products.
(f) “Person” means an individual, partnership, firm, limited liability company, joint stock company, corporation, association, trust, estate, or other legal entity.
(g) “Purchaser” means any person who purchases dog training services.
(h) “Temporary enclosure” means a structure used to restrict a dog, including, but not limited to, a crate or cage, that does not provide for the effective separation of a dog from the dog’s waste products.
122395.2. (a) A dog trainer shall deliver to a purchaser of dog training services a written disclosure containing all of the following:
(1) The trainer’s name and address.
(2) Whether the trainer is licensed or certified by any animal training organization.
(3) The trainer’s training techniques and whether they use negative reinforcement or shock collars.
(4) A written training plan describing the nature and goals of the training.
(5) A record of any injury sustained by dogs in their care.
(b) The written disclosure made pursuant to this section shall be signed by the trainer certifying the accuracy of the statement, and by the purchaser of the training services acknowledging receipt of the statement.
(c) In addition, all medical information required to be disclosed pursuant to this section shall be made orally by the trainer to the purchaser.
122395.3. (a) A dog trainer shall maintain a written record on the health, status, and disposition of each dog trained at the training facility for a period of at least one year after the completion of training.
(b) It is unlawful for a dog trainer to fail to do any of the following:
(1) Maintain facilities where the dogs are kept or trained in a sanitary condition.
(2) Provide dogs with adequate nutrition, when needed, and potable water.
(3) Provide adequate space appropriate to the age, size, weight, and breed of dog. For purposes of this paragraph, “adequate space” means sufficient space for the dog to stand up, sit down, and turn about freely using normal body movements, and if caged, without the head touching the top of the cage, and to lie in a natural position.
(4) Provide dogs with a rest board, floormat, or similar device that can be maintained in a sanitary condition.
(5) Provide dogs with adequate socialization and exercise, as appropriate during the course of the training. For the purpose of this article, “socialization” means physical contact with other dogs and with human beings.
(6) Wash hands before and after handling an infectious or contagious dog.
(7) Provide veterinary care without delay when necessary.
122395.4. Each dog training facility operator shall be responsible for all of the following:
(a) Ensuring that the entire dog training facility, including all equipment therein, is structurally sound and maintained in good repair.
(b) Ensuring that pests do not inhabit any part of the facility in a number large enough to be harmful, threatening, or annoying to the dogs.
(c) Ensuring the containment of dogs within the facility, and, in the event that a dog escapes, making reasonable efforts to immediately capture the escaped dog.
(d) If an escaped dog has not been captured despite reasonable efforts, ensuring that all material facts regarding the dog’s escape are reported to the local agency for animal control and to the purchaser.
(e) Ensuring that the facility’s interior building surfaces, including walls and floors, are constructed in a manner that permits them to be readily cleaned and sanitized.
(f) Ensuring that light, by natural or artificial means, is distributed in a manner that permits routine inspection and cleaning, and the proper care and maintenance of the dogs.
(g) Maintaining an area in the facility for isolating sick dogs from healthy dogs.
122395.5. (a) Each permanent or fixed and temporary enclosure shall comply with all of the following standards:
(1) Be structurally sound and maintained in good repair to protect the enclosed dog from injury, to contain the dog, to keep other dogs out, and to promote the health and well-being of the dog.
(2) Be maintained in a comfortable and sanitary manner. When being cleaned in a manner or with a substance that is or may be harmful to a dog within the enclosure, that dog shall be removed from the enclosure.
(3) Be constructed of material suitable for regular cleaning and sanitizing.
(4) As needed to ensure the comfort and well-being of the dog, provide heating, cooling, lighting, ventilation, shade, and protection from the elements, including, but not limited to, the sun, wind, rain, and snow.
(5) Allow a dog to turn around freely, stand easily, and sit or lie down in a comfortable position.
(b) Each enclosure is either a permanent or fixed enclosure or a temporary enclosure.
(c) A dog may be contained in a temporary enclosure for a period not to exceed four hours during the day and 12 hours at night or the length of time that is humane for that particular dog, whichever is less. However, the dog shall remain outside the temporary enclosure for no less than the amount of time needed for the dog to eliminate its waste.
122395.6. A dog training facility operator shall comply with all of the following care requirements:
(a) Use methods of training that will not hurt or injure the dog.
(b) Provide each dog with easy and convenient access to potable water at all times, or if the behavior of the dog makes unrestricted access to water impracticable, offer water as often as necessary to ensure the dog’s health and well-being. However, water may be restricted as directed by the purchaser or a licensed veterinarian.
(c) Provide each dog with nutritious food in quantities and at intervals suitable for that dog.
(d) Provide each dog daily with enrichment sufficient to maintain the behavioral health of the dog.
(e) Maintain and abide by written policies and procedures that address dog care, management, and safe handling, disease prevention and control, routine care, preventive care, emergency care, veterinary treatment, and disaster planning, evacuation, and recovery that are applicable to the location of the dog training facility. These procedures shall be reviewed with each employee who provides care to the dogs and shall be present, in writing, either electronically or physically, in the facility and made available to all employees.
(f) Isolate those dogs that have or are suspected of having a contagious condition.
(g) Ensure that each sick or injured dog is immediately provided with appropriate care and, if prudent, veterinary treatment.
(h) Ensure that the purchaser is notified immediately that their dog is sick or injured unless the purchaser has indicated in writing that notification of any, or a particular, type of illness or injury is not required.
(i) In the event of a natural disaster, an emergency evacuation, or other similar occurrence, ensure that the humane care and treatment of each dog is provided for, as required by this chapter, to the extent access to the dog is reasonably available.
122395.7. (a) A dog training facility operator shall provide each purchaser with written information describing all of the following:
(1) Days and times during which the facility permits dogs to be dropped off and picked up.
(2) Days and times during which personnel are onsite.
(3) The square footage of the permanent or fixed enclosure or a temporary enclosure in which the dog may be contained during the course of the training.
(4) The training facility’s customary daily activity schedule, including any general observation practices conducted by facility personnel during the training period.
(b) If the training facility will materially deviate from the customary practices described in the written information required by subdivision (a) with respect to a dog, the facility operator shall disclose those deviations to the purchaser, as appropriate.
122395.8. (a) An animal control officer, as defined in Section 830.9 of the Penal Code, a humane officer qualified pursuant to Section 14502 or 14503 of the Corporations Code, or a peace officer who detects a violation of this chapter, if that individual determines that the violation warrants formal action, shall issue a single notice to correct that shall contain all of the following information:
(1) Specify each violation of this chapter found in the inspection.
(2) Identify the corrective action for each violation.
(3) Include a specific period of time during which the listed violation or violations are to be corrected.
(b) After issuing a notice to correct pursuant to this section, the officer or another qualified officer of the issuing agency shall verify compliance with this chapter by conducting a subsequent investigation of the dog training facility within a reasonable period of time.
(c) An exact, legible copy of the notice to correct shall be delivered to the facility operator at the time of signing. In the alternative, the issuing officer may personally deliver the notice to the operator within 48 hours of its issuance, excluding holidays and weekends. The signing of the notice is an acknowledgment of receipt and does not constitute an admission of guilt.
(d) A dog training facility operator who is verified to have complied with a notice to correct shall not be subject to subdivision (g).
(e) A dog training facility operator who violates the same provision of this chapter on more than one occasion within a five-year period is not eligible to receive a notice to correct, and is guilty of an infraction on the second violation, and is guilty of a misdemeanor on the third or subsequent violation.
(f) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), a dog training facility operator that causes or allows harm or injury to a dog, or allows a dog to be subject to an unreasonable risk of harm or injury, is guilty of a misdemeanor.
(g) Except as provided in subdivisions (e) and (f), a dog training facility operator who violates any provision of this chapter is guilty of an infraction punishable by a fine not to exceed two hundred fifty dollars ($250) for the first violation and by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000) for each subsequent violation. The court shall weigh the gravity of the offense in setting the penalty.
122395.9. (a) A trainer who violates this chapter shall be subject to a civil penalty of up to one thousand dollars ($1,000), or shall be prohibited from training dogs for up to 30 days, or both. For a second offense, the trainer shall be subject to a civil penalty of up to two thousand five hundred dollars ($2,500), or a prohibition from training dogs for up to 90 days, or both. For a third offense, the trainer shall be subject to a civil penalty of up to five thousand dollars ($5,000), or a prohibition from training dogs for up to six months, or both. For a fourth and subsequent offenses, the trainer shall be subject to a civil penalty of up to ten thousand dollars ($10,000) or a prohibition from training dogs for up to one year, or both.
(b) An action for recovery of the civil penalty and for a court order enjoining the trainer from engaging in the business of training dogs pursuant to this section may be prosecuted by the district attorney for the county in which the violation occurred, or the city attorney for the city in that the violation occurred, in the appropriate court.
SEC. 2. No reimbursement is required by this act pursuant to Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution for certain costs that may be incurred by a local agency or school district because, in that regard, this act creates a new crime or infraction, eliminates a crime or infraction, or changes the penalty for a crime or infraction, within the meaning of Section 17556 of the Government Code, or changes the definition of a crime within the meaning of Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution.
However, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that this act contains other costs mandated by the state, reimbursement to local agencies and school districts for those costs shall be made pursuant to Part 7 (commencing with Section 17500) of Division 4 of Title 2 of the Government Code.
Amended in Assembly, March 24, 2022 to delete all facilities and penalty provisions, Section 1 (b) through (e) and (h) and 122395.2(c) to the end and amend as follows: 122395.2. (3) The trainer’s training techniques and whether they use negative reinforcement or shock collars. philosophy and (5) A record of any injury sustained by dogs in their care. Any civil judgments, or criminal animal cruelty convictions, related to the dog trainer’s services. 
Assembly Com on Business & Professions Policy Analysis, April 16, 2022
Amended in Assembly, April 20, 2022 to amend 122395.2. (a)(5) Any civil judgments judgments, or criminal animal cruelty convictions, related to the dog trainer’s services.

Prior legislation, 2020 AB 2691 (Bauer-Kahan) dual assigned ASM B&P, Judiciary, never heard due to Covid priorities.
Also see REFERENCE GUIDE: CA AB 2691 (Bauer-Kahan) Dog Training, 2/24/2020;  2016 AB 995 (Monning) Media, January19, 2022; ABC7 SF
Families remember lost pets amid renewed calls for regulation of dog training industry
ASM Com on Business & Professions
HRG 4/19
Pass 13-5(1)’

ASM Floor 5/5
Pass 50-11(17)
AB 2380
Introduced
2/17/2022
Brian Maienschein (D-77) San DiegoAs introduced, AB 2380 would add to the Financial Code a new §22348 reading: “A licensee shall not make a consumer loan to a borrower if that loan is to purchase a dog or cat.”
Amended in Assembly, April 5, 2022 to revise Section 1 to read: 22348.
 A licensee shall not make a consumer loan to a borrower if that loan is to purchase  for the purpose of purchasing  a dog or cat. cat if the loan is offered, arranged, or facilitated by a merchant or retailer.
Note: the California Financing Law authorizes the Commissioner of the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation to license, regulate, and discipline finance lenders and brokers making consumer loans. Violations are crimes.
ASM Com on Banking & Finance
HRG 4/18 Fiscal Committee
AB 2606
Introduced
2/18/2022
Wendy Carrillo
(D-41) Los Angeles
(Principal coauthor: Senator Stern)
(Coauthor: Assembly Member Santiago)
As introduced, AB 2606 would add to the Food & Agricultural Code a new §31755 to read as follows:
 (a) For purposes of this section, the following definitions apply:
(1) “Cat” means an animal of the taxonomic family felidae, except an animal that is a member of an exotic or native wild cat species as defined in Section 597.6 of the Penal Code.
(2) “Declawing” means an onychectomy or any other surgical procedure to amputate or modify a portion of a cat’s paw in order to remove the cat’s claws. “Declawing” does not include the trimming of nonviable claw husk or placing nonpermanent nail caps.
(3) “Tendonectomy” means a procedure in which the tendons to a cat’s limbs, paws, or toes are cut or modified so that the normal functioning of the claws is impaired.
(4) “Therapeutic purpose” means a medically necessary procedure to address an existing or recurring infection, disease, injury, or abnormal condition in the claw that jeopardizes the cat’s health. “Therapeutic purpose” does not include a procedure performed for a cosmetic or aesthetic purpose or to make the cat more convenient to keep or handle.
(b) (1) A person shall not perform surgical claw removal, declawing, or a tendonectomy on any cat or otherwise alter a cat’s toes, claws, or paws to prevent or impair the normal function of the cat’s toes, claws, or paws.
(2) This subdivision does not apply to a procedure performed solely for a therapeutic purpose.
(c) A violation of this section shall be subject to a civil penalty of five hundred dollars ($500) for the first violation, one thousand dollars ($1,000) for the second violation, and two thousand five hundred dollars ($2,500) for the third and any subsequent violation.
(d) This section does not preempt any local ordinance prohibiting surgical claw removal, declawing, or a tendonectomy on any cat, or otherwise prohibiting the altering of a cat’s toes, claws, or paws to prevent the normal function of the cat’s toes, claws, or paws, or imposing a more severe penalty for performing such an action.
Issue history New York 2019 Senate Bill S5532B is the first declaw state law to be enacted. Recent California Bills
ASM C om on Business & Professions
HRG 4/26


Fiscal Commitee
AB 2723
Introduced
2/18/2022
Chris R. Holden (D-41)
Pasadena
As introduced, AB 2723 would


Assembly Com on Business & Professions Policy Analysis, March 25, 2022
Dual referred:

ASM Com on Business & Professions
HRG 3/29

pass 13-0(3)


ASM Com on Public Safety
Hrg 4/26

Fiscal Committee
AB 2785
Introduced
2/18/2022
Laura Friedman
(D-43)
Glendale
As introduced, AB 2785 would amend Health & Safety Code §122317 (enacted by 2021 AB 468, Friedman that added a new Article 4. Emotional Support Animals,) amending only one subsection as to required type size for notice, appearing to be a spot bill.